Christmas Medical Miracle: Poised to Donate Organs, 21-Year-Old Emerges From Coma

December 15th, 2014

Sam Schmid, an Arizona college student believed to be brain dead and poised to be an organ donor, miraculously recovered just hours before doctors were considering taking him off life support.

Schmid, a junior and business major at the University of Arizona, was critically wounded in anOct. 19 five-car accident in Tucson.

The 21-year-old’s brain injuries were so severe that the local hospital could not treat him. He was airlifted to the Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Phoenix, where specialists performed surgery for a life-threatening aneurysm.

As hospital officials began palliative care and broached the subject of organ donation with his family, Schmid began to respond, holding up two fingers on command. Today, he is walking with the aid of a walker, and his speech, although slow, has improved.

Doctors say he will likely have a complete recovery. He even hopes to get a day pass from the hospital to celebrate the holidays with his large extended family.

“Nobody could ever give me a better Christmas present than this — ever, ever, ever,” said his mother, Susan Regan, who is vice-president of the insurance company Lovitt-Touche.

“I tell everyone, if they want to call it a modern-day miracle, this is a miracle,” said Regan, 59, and a Catholic. “I have friends who are atheists who have called me and said, ‘I am going back to church.’”

Schmid’s doctor, renowned neurosurgeon Dr. Robert Spetzler, agreed that his recovery was miraculous.

“I am dumbfounded with his incredible recovery in such a short time,” said Spetzler. “His recovery was really remarkable considering the extent of his lethal injuries.”

Hospital officials are crediting Spetzler with having a “hunch” that despite an initially dire prognosis, the young man would make it. But he said it was “reasonable” for others to consider withdrawing the patient from life support.

“It looked like all the odds were stacked against him,” said Spetzler, who has performed more than 6,000 such surgeries and trained the doctor who operated on Congressman Gabrielle Giffords after she was shot at the beginning of this year.

During surgery, Spetzler clipped the balloonlike aneurysm in the blood vessel — “as if I were patching a tire,” a procedure that eventually worked.

For days Schmid didn’t seem to be responding, but what puzzled his doctor was that he did not see fatal injuries on the MRI scan. So he decided to keep Schmid on life support longer.

“There was plenty wrong — he had a hemorrhage, an aneurysm and a stroke from the part of the aneurysm,” Spetzler said. “But he didn’t have a blood clot in the most vital part of his brain, which we know he can’t recover from. And he didn’t have a massive stroke that would predict no chance of a useful existence.”

So while the family was given a realistic picture of Schmid’s poor chances for survival, Spetzler ordered one more MRI to see if the critical areas of the brain had turned dark, indicating brain death.

“If not, we would hang on and keep him on support,” he said. “But I didn’t want to give the family false hope.”

Schmid’s mother said no one “specifically” asked if her son would be a donor, but they “subtly talk to you about quality of life.”

“At some point, I knew we had to make some sort of decision, and I kept praying,” said Regan.

The MRI came back with encouraging news during the day and by evening Schmid “inexplicably” followed the doctors’ commands, holding up two fingers.

“It was like fireworks all going off at the same time,” said Spetzler.

Today, Schmid — his speech clear and sounding upbeat — told ABCNews.com, “I feel fine. I’m in a wheelchair, but I am getting lots of help.”

Sam Schmid Has No Memory of the Accident

He said he remembers nothing of the accident nor coming around after being in an induced coma. “It wasn’t until I woke up in rehab,” he said. “But they told me about afterwards.”

Schmid was returning from coaching basketball at his former Catholic school when a van swerved into his lane. The Jeep in which he was riding went airborne, hit a light pole and landed on its side.

Schmid’s left hand and both of his femurs broke and required surgery. But the worst were the traumatic head injuries, which were complex and nearly always fatal.

All those involved say the support that Schmid got from family and friends — and especially the care at Barrow — may have made the difference. His brother John, a 24-year-old IT specialist, took a leave of absence from his job in Chicago to be at his brother’s bedside.

Family flew in from around the country, and Delta Chi fraternity brothers made regular visits, even creating a mural for their friend.

“It seems like we were being led down a path to plan for the worst and that things were not going to work out,” said John Schmid. “The miracle, to put it bluntly, was that in a matter of seven days, we went from organ donation to rehab. What a roller coaster it was.”

He said his brother’s speech is slow, but he understands what others are saying. Sam Schmid’s athleticism — as a basketball coach and snowboard instructor — probably helped, he said.

“Honestly, I am at a loss for words,” said John Schmid. “I am just so proud of Sam. He’s got a strong constitution and he’s very determined. But it’s been quite an eye-opener for me — a real learning curve. You can’t take anything for granted.”

Sam Schmid’s surgeon agrees.

“You get incredible highs when you save someone facing neurological devastation or death,” said Spetzler. “That is counter-pointed by the incredible lows when you fail to help someone.”

“In a way, his recovery was truly miraculous,” he said. “It’s a great Christmas story.”

Ever the scientist, Spetzler wasn’t willing to speculate what a comatose patient hears. But he admits, “There are so many things we don’t understand about the brain and what happens at the time someone is near death.”

“The whole family was at his side during the day and at night hovering over him, then to see there was a chance after being ready to let go,” he said. “But I am very much a big believer that positive thoughts and positive energy in a room can only help.”

Medical miracle: Mother, newborn son revived after dying in labor on Christmas Eve

December 15th, 2014

Believers would call it a Christmas miracle: A mother dies in labor on Christmas Eve. Her child is stillborn. Then, minutes later, both of them come miraculously back to life.

Tracy Hermanstorfer had stopped breathing during labor at Memorial Hospital in Colorado Springs.

“She had no signs of life. No heartbeat, no blood pressure, she wasn’t breathing,” Dr. Stephanie Martin, a maternal fetal medicine specialist at the hospital, told the AP.

The baby boy, who was delivered by Cesarean section, “was basically limp, with a very slow heart rate,” Martin said.

Hermanstorfer, 35, had arrived at the hospital with her husband Mike, 37, and appeared normal – at first. During the prep for childbirth the woman began to feel sleepy and laid back in her bed.

“She literally stopped breathing and her heart stopped,” said her husband.

Doctors and nurses tried feverishly to revive her, to no avail.

“I was holding her hand when we realized she was gone,” Hermanstorfer told the Associated Press. “My entire life just rolled out.”

The doctors told the husband they would then take his son out, as they could not revive the mother.

“They handed him to me, he’s absolutely lifeless,” Hermanstorfer said.

But the doctors worked on him, and suddenly he came to.

“His life began in my hands,” Hermanstorfer said. “That’s a feeling like no other.”

Soon after, Tracy Hermanstorfer’s pulse returned, even though she had no heartbeat for roughly four minutes.

Later, she had no memory of the events.

“I just felt like I was asleep,” she told the AP. “I’m like, ‘holy cow, what it that bad?”

There is no clear medical explanation for Hermanstorfer and her son’s recoveries, Dr. Martin told the AP.

“We did a thorough evaluation and can’t find anything that explains why this happened,” she said.

The couple, and their healthy child.

It was a Christmas Medical Miracle!

Choosing your resume photo. What’s acceptable and what’s not…

November 21st, 2014

We all know the expression: “a picture worth a 1000 words”… and some of us seem to take it for granted and consider that looks dont count and shouldn’t thrump skills and experience when it comes to your resume… and on some levels they are right, it’s not about looks but it is about appearences.

In this article we will talk about what kind of photos are suitable for a CV  and what kind of photographs are not. It’s critical to make a good impression and sometimes it can mean getting called in for an interview or being rejected by the employer.

First of all, your resume must allways be accompanied by your recent photograph. Not adding a photograph is not a viable option!

There are certain differences when it comes to choosing a photograph, depending if you are male or female.

Let’s start with the female candidates:

  • Choose a photograp that highlights your face! Be sure not to have your hair cofering half of your face and leave photoshop out of it. Resume Photos don’t need to be black and wight or overly corrected.
  • Now that you have chosen a photo highlighting your face and you steared clear of photoshop, be careful with the make-up! Adding to much make-up can give away an image of frivolity  and make employers dismiss your application.
  • If you have a lot of piercings or a lot of earrings, it would be a good idea to tone it down for the resume photo. In fact, excessive jewlery can seem tacky to some employers.

And now with the men:

  • As with the girls, it’s important to remove piercings or earrings as well as having a decent hairdo. It’s important to be in tone with the position you are applying for. We can assure you that a photo where you show off your piercings, punk-rock hair style and bad boy attitude won’t help you get the position in the law firm….

And some common tips:

  1. Try not to use photos form  weddings, or other social gatherings. Its best if you can take a nice photograph with a nice plain white background.
  2. Dress for the job you want to get! A suit and a tie is allways the best choice!

We sincerely hoped this aricle helped you understand the importance of a reasume photo and we hope that you will take in consideration our advice.

Sincerely,

The EGV Recruiting Team

Germany – Citizens see doctors as the main contact for the prevention of diseases

November 9th, 2014

Hamburg – Regarding prevention of diseases, doctors are the first and main point of contact for people in Germany. Nearly nine out of ten respondents would turn to doctors when it comes to preventing diseases, according to the Forsa institute.

As a secondary contact regarding disease prevention, German citizens turn to the representatives of the health insurance agencies. And only a small portion of the population (one out of four Germans) thrust the opinion of fitness instructors and nutritionists.

90% of German citisens consider that “prevention is important because it can prevent suffering by helping people not getting sick in the first place.

Source of the article here : http://www.aerzteblatt.de/nachrichten/60732/Buerger-sehen-Aerzte-als-Hauptansprechpartner-bei-der-Praevention

MSF vs EBOLA – Tough Job Great Reward

October 19th, 2014

What is Ebola?

Reading the newspaper, watching TV or browsing social media, we all see more and more articles or reports about the Ebola outbreak and we react to these posts in different ways.

Why? Because for some of us it’s just another crisis in a contry  far far away from our home, and that’s why we choose to ignore it… Or not!

EBOLA:

“Ebola is a virus that can kill up to 90 percent of the people who catch it, causing terror among infected communities. Ebola can be caught from both humans and animals. It is not an air-borne disease. Human to human transmission occurs through close contact with bodily fluids of an Ebola-infected person. Patients need to be treated in isolation by staff wearing protective clothing. Supportive care can help the patient survive longer, and the extra time may just be what the patient’s own immune system needs to fight the virus.” – MSF

MSF’s West Africa Ebola response:

MSF’s West Africa Ebola response started in March 2014 and now counts activities in three countries: Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. MSF currently employs 276 international and around 2,977 locally hired staff in the region. The organisation operates six Ebola case management centres (CMCs), providing nearly 600 beds in isolation. Since the beginning of the outbreak, MSF has admitted more than 4,500 patients, among whom more than 2,700 were confirmed as having Ebola. Around 1,000 have survived. More than 807 tonnes of supplies have been shipped to the affected countries since March. As of 10 October, the estimated budget for MSF’s activities on the West Africa Ebola outbreak until the end of 2014 is 46.2 million euros.

Simultaneously, there is an unrelated outbreak of Ebola in DRC. Sixty-seven MSF staff are working on this outbreak and two case management centres have been established: one in Lokolia (40 beds) and one in Boende (10 beds). There has also been a confirmed case of Marburg fever in Uganda. MSF teams are supporting the response by reinforcing local capacities on infection control and treatment.Since the Ebola outbreak in West Africa was officially declared on 22 March in Guinea, it has claimed 4,492 lives. The outbreak is the largest ever, and is currently affecting three countries in West Africa: Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Two countries in West Africa are in the period of counting days because there are no more active cases: Senegal and Nigeria. Two people in the United States of America (USA) and one person in Spain are currently being treated for Ebola.

Following announcements made in the last weeks, deployment of international aid is slowly taking place in the three main countries affected. However, there is little indication that current efforts to increase capacity to isolate and take care of suspected and confirmed Ebola cases will address needs sufficiently.

 

The United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER) has been set up and will be based in Ghana to pursue five strategic priorities: stop the spread of the disease; treat the infected; ensure essential services; preserve stability; and prevent the spread of the disease to countries currently unaffected.

MSF teams in West Africa are still seeing critical gaps in all aspects of the response, including medical care, training of health staff, infection control, contact tracing, epidemiological surveillance, alert and referral systems, community education and mobilisation.

MSF has been responding to the outbreak since March, and currently has a total of 3,253 staff working in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, treating a rapidly increasing number of patients. Twenty-one MSF staff have been infected with Ebola since March, six of whom have recovered. The vast majority of these infections were found to have occurred in the community.

Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is an international, independent, medical humanitarian organisation that delivers emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare. MSF offers assistance to people based on need, irrespective of race, religion, gender or political affiliation.

Support the MSF cause! http://www.msf.org/diseases/ebola

 

Things to do before moving abroad (Part 1)

September 4th, 2014

Master the language – “The only weapon that becomes sharper with constant use is the tongue.”

When visiting another country, it’s ok not to know the language because people are usually kind with tourists and are eager to help you out.

When you are considering moving to another country however it’s a different story. As you demand employment opportunities, the employers demand that you have all the skills necessary to do the job, and yes! The language counts!!!

Picture yourself going to a job interview and the employer would ask you something simple in their mother tongue like “did you find our office easily” and the first thing you would reply in a different language, let’s say English, “I’m sorry I didn’t understand your question”

Let’s say you start working as a doctor in Germany, and you are on call for the first time all by yourself and a patient comes in and speaks very fast and he is visibly troubled and in pain and you can’t really understand what he’s saying…

 

Don’t be that guy! Be the skilled professional you strive to be once you move abroad!


Take the time to master the language before moving to a foreign country and we guarantee you that the integration process will be much smoother!

  • If it’s possible, have the certainty of a job abroad

Over the past year we were often contacted by desperate candidates that already moved abroad and the story was always the same: “I need help! I moved to Germany a couple of months ago because I was promised a position as a doctor at the hospital but as I got here the Hospital didn’t employ me”.

We seriously recommend that once you master the language before actually moving abroad you should try to arrange some interviews with possible employers before actually moving abroad. Go to the interviews and if an employer wants to hire you make sure you obtain the confirmation of employment on an official paper!

 

Of course, a good idea could be to contact us and we can arrange all the interviews and papers for you ;)

  • Have all the paperwork ready

This part is two-fold! On one hand you have to obtain the papers required for employmend and visa (if necessary) from your homeland and on the other hand you have to maintain close contact with the authorities abroad for obtaining the license to practice medicine, the right to rent housing abroad etc.

The kick is that for example in Germany, every land requires different papers for the same things. If you are not careful you might go all the way to Germany and realize that you are missing something and you have to start all over again.

Be smart! Do the research, make a list, prioritize, keep contact with the authorities or if you want to forget about all this hastle, just go ahead and contact us.

  • Search for housing ahead

Just as you wouldn’t go today on a holyday without checking out the details about the hotel on booking.com or on their webpage, I don’t believe you would blindly sign a lease to an apartment.

The internet is full with good offers but also with scams. We recommend you book a hotelroom at first and go on set to see what kind of housing is available.

Afterwards compare all offers and choose the one that fits your needs!

 

  • Learn ahead about the place you are moving into

Every country and city has its ups and downs. Don’t forget. Germany is not only Koln, Berlin and Munchen, England is not only London and France is not only Paris.

Smaller cities have their upsides too and most of them have a lot to offer in terms of leisure, employment opportunities, etc.

For Germany for example we have on our website a short description for every German state here: http://mejobs.eu/en/job-offers-de.html

 

We here at EGV consider that it’s important to start your new beginning with the right foot and establish yourselves as professionals right from the start. Professionals will never be seen as outsiders!

If you would like more help and advice from us, feel free to contact us here: http://mejobs.eu/en/contact.html  

 

 

Goodbye Headaches! Hello technology!

August 22nd, 2014

Something as simple as a common headache can ruin the daily rutine of every person no matter what.

But what would you do if you would commonly have migranes twice or three times per week? 

Think about it… How would you be able to function like a normal human being? 

For Gabriella Iaocovetti, severe headaches three or four times a week can bring her business and family life to a halt.

“No light. No noise. I try to put my head under the covers,” she says.

Like many migraine suffers, Iaocovetti also gets nauseous, which makes taking pills a problem.

“Patients will tell you, ‘Food hangs in my stomach. I’m sick to my stomach,’” says Dr. Stephen Silberstein at Jefferson University Hospital.

Even when Iaocovetti can swallow a pill, she says it takes several doses to find relief. Then, her doctor told her about an alternative now being tested. It is called the Zelrix Patch. It uses Sumatriptan, one of the most common migraine medications.

Since the drug is not normally absorbed through the skin, researchers added a tiny chip which generates a micro-current of electricity, to push it into the pores. It is about the same strength as the chips that power a musical greeting card.

Jane Hollingsworth heads up Nupath, the company that makes the chips.

“There’s a little button that you push and that starts it,” she explains. “A little red light tells you if it’s working or not, so you can see it.”

She says the patch delivers a controlled amount of medication for four hours then shuts off. She says so far, there have been no significant side effects in the clinical trials. Iaocovetti enrolled in the double blind study and while there is no way to know if she received the real patch, she believes her symptoms are already better.

The results of phase three clinical trials showed the patch was effective in treating migraines. 

 

Would you choose this alternative over a common Aspirine?

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern: A German state with a lot to offer!

July 13th, 2014

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern  is a federal state in northern Germany. The capital city is Schwerin. The state was formed through the merger of the historic regions of Mecklenburg and Vorpommern after World War II, dissolved in 1952 and recreated prior to the

German reunification in 1990. Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is the sixth largest German state by territory, and the least densely populated one. The coastline of the Baltic Sea, including islands such as Rügen and Usedom, as well as the Mecklenburg Lake District are characterized by many holiday resorts and pristine nature, making Mecklenburg-Vorpommern one of Germany’s leading tourist destinations.

   
Rügen
   
Usedom
Three of Germany’s fourteen national parks are in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, in addition to several hundred nature conservation areas.
Major cities in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern include Rostock, Schwerin, Neubrandenburg, Stralsund, Greifswald and Wismar. The University of Rostock and the University of Greifswald are among the oldest in Europe.
  
Schwerin

Culture
Over the centuries, Mecklenburg and Vorpommern have developed and maintained strong regional cultures. It can generally be described as North German and has similar linguistic and historic characteristics to other north German states, such as Schleswig-Holstein.
Architecture
The cities are characterized by a certain “Hanseatic” style also found in other parts of northern Germany as well as in countries bordering the Baltic Sea. A common feature of many towns in Mecklenburg and Vorpommern are Gothic red brick churches dating back to the middle Ages. The old towns are usually built around one or several market places with a church or town hall. Often towns were founded at the Baltic Sea, one of the many lakes or a river for logistical and trade motives.
Greifswald

Museums, art and theaters:
The largest publicly-funded theaters in the state are the Mecklenburg State Theatre, the Rostock People’s Theatre, the Theatre of West Pomerania, with venues in Greifswald, Stralsund and Putbus, and the Mecklenburg State Theatre at Neusterlitz with venues in Neubrandenburg and Neusterlitz.
Since 1993, the Störtebeker Festival has taken place in Ralswiek on the island of Rügen. It is Germany’s most successful open-air theatre.
  
Störtebeker Festival
Notable museums include, for example, the Schwerin State Museum and the Pomeranian State Museum at Greifswald. The German Maritime Museum with its Ozeaneum in Stralsund is the most popular museum in northern Germany.
 
Ozeaneum in Stralsund
Furthermore, the German Amber Museum in Ribnitz-Damagarten, Rostock’s Abbey of the Holy Cross and Rostock Art Gallery are of national importance.
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is home to many cultural events throughout the year. During summer, many open air concerts and operas are open to visitors. The Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival (Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) attracts a sizeable audience by performing classical concerts in parks, churches and castles.
  
The Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival
Caspar David Friedrich, a famous romanticist painter born in Greifswald, immortalized parts of the state in several of his paintings.
  
Caspar David Friedrich- Greifswald
Food and drinks
Like most German regions, Mecklenburg and Vorpommern have their own traditional dishes, often including fish, beef and pork. Rostock has its own type of bratwurst called Rostocker Bratwurst. An unusual food from Western Pomerania is Tollatsch. Rote Grütze is a popular dessert. The largest brewery produces Lübzer Pils.
  
Tollatsch, Rote Grütze , Lübzer Pils

Economy
In Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, approximately 732,200 people were gainfully employed in 2008 with 657,100 of them were withe and blue collar workers. About 4,200 new jobs were created in 2007. Employees worked an average of 1,455 hours a year. The number of self-employed did not change in 2008. Three out of every four of all people in work are employed in the service sector.
The biggest businesses in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern are the ferry operator Scandlines AG, the NETTO supermarket chain, the shipbuilders Aker MTW Werft, Volkswerft Stralsund GmbH and Aker Warnow Werft GmbH, the Energiewerke Nord GmbH and the shipping company F. Laeisz GmbH.

Tourism
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is among the top three destinations for inner-German tourism. The main tourist regions are:
  • Islands: Rügen and Usedom
  • Peninsula: Fischland-Darß-Zingst
  • Seaside towns: Heiligendamm, Graal-Müritz or Kühlungsborn
  • Cities: Stralsund and Wismar, both listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Rostock or Greifswald which have a large cultural heritage.
As a relic of the past, nearly 2,000 castles, palaces and manor houses exist in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, many of which function as venues for public events like concerts and festivals.
 
  
Notable people:
  • arts and film: Ernst Barlach, Friedrich von Flotow, Caspar David Friedrich, Marianne Hoppe, Till Lindemann, Philipp Otto Runge
  • business: Ernst Heinkel, Carl Heinrich von Siemens, Georg Wertheim
  • literature: Ernst Moritz Arndt, John Brinckman, Hans Fallada, Walter Kempowski, Fritz Reuter, Rudolf Tarnow, Ehm Welk
  • politics: Ernst Moritz Arndt, Dietmar Bartsch, Egon Krenz, Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, Harald Ringstorff, Angela Merkel, Joachim Gauck
  • science: Theodor Billroth, Friedrich Chrysander, Walther Flemming, Gottlob Frege, Otto Lilienthal, Gustav Mie, Ferdinand von Mueller, Paul Pogge, Heinrich Schliemann, Johannes Stark
  • sports: Tim Borowski, Andreas Dittmer, Thomas Doll, Marita Koch, Toni Kroos, Jan Ullrich, Jens Voigt, Sebastian Sylvester
If our article peaked your interest about this lovely German state, why don’t you check out our job-offers here at: www.MeJobs.eu and you’ll be one step closer to working as a doctor in Germany!

Thuringen and its offer – Or what one can do and expect when living in Thuringen!

July 6th, 2014

The free state of Thüringen is located in the central part of Germany. From the northwest going clockwise, Thüringen has borders with the states of Lower Sachsen, Sachsen-Anhalt, Sachsen, Bayern and Hessen. Thüringen is the sixth smallest by area and the fifth smallest by population of Germany´s sixteen states. Its capital city is Erfurt.


Erfurt cathedral and Severikirche


Erfurt Town Hall

Thüringen has been known by the nickname of ´´the green heart of Germany´´, from the late 19th century, due to the dense forest that covers the terrain. The ridges of the western Harz Mountains divide the region from Lower Sachsen on the north-west, while the eastern Harz similarly separates Thüringen from the state of Sachsen-Anhalt to the north-east. To the south and southwest, the Thüringen Forest effectively separates the ancient region of Franconia, now the northern part of Bavaria, from the rolling plains of most of Thüringen. The central Harz range extends southwards along the western side into the northwest corner of the Thüringen Forest region, Making Thüringen a lowland basin of rolling plains nearly surrounded by ancient somewhat-difficult mountains. To the west across the mountains and south is the drainage basin on the Rhine River.


Thüringen forest north of Schweinfurt

After the capital city of Erfurt, important urban districts are Eisenach, Gera, Jena, Suhl and Weimar.

 
Eisenach Nikolai Chuch, Luther House

 

 
Gera, view from above and Town hall

 


Jena

 


Suhl from above

 

 
Grand-Ducal Palace Weimar, Goethe Schiller monument Weimar

 Culture:

 Culture is thicker on the ground in Thüringen than in any other state in Germany. Castles, palaces, gardens and historical monasteries can be found dotting the landscape throughout the state. Thüringen boasts over 30,000 architectural and art monuments as well as 3000 archeological sites. Culture has shaped both the region´s heritage and its contemporary identity.

Belvedere Castle Weimar

Wartburg Castle
 
Bibra Castle, Ehrenburg Castle 
Classicism is at home in Thüringen. In a one-of-a-kind ensemble, the Klassik Stiftung Weimar unites museums of art and literature, the historic homes of literary luminaries and royal palaces and gardens.
This is where the legacy of Goethe and Schiller is kept alive. The spectrum covered by the collections, which have been pieced together over more than 400 years, is unequalled anywhere in the world. Among the most important institutions are the Goethe National Museum, Schiller´s Home, the Widow´s Palace, the Duchess Anna Amalia Library, the Goethe and Schiller Archive, the Nietzsche Archive and the Wieland Estate in Ossmannstedt.
 
Goethe National Museum Weimar

The Widow´s Palace

Wieland Estate in Ossmannstedt
As a land of culture, Thüringen also possesses a museum landscape that has evolved over time and continues to grow, with a number of new additions in recent years. In a total of 180 museums, art and cultural treasures of international, national and regional significance are collected, researched and exhibited. The Buchenwald and Mittelbau-Dora Memorials Foundation, by contrast, is dedicated to the task of preserving the two concentration camp sites as places of mourning and commemoration, as well as documenting and researching the historical background behind the crimes committed there.

Buchenwald concentration camp entrance
One glance at the map shows that Thüringen has more theaters and orchestras per square kilometer than any other territorial state in Germany. This cultural diversity is nurtured and maintained.
 
Theater Gera and Altenburg


Theater interior Altenburg

Thüringen has also made a name for itself over the past several years with its annual musical festivals: in summer the TFF Rudolstadt Roots Folk World Music Festival attracts crowds of music-lovers. Other cultural high points during the year are the Kulturarena in Jena, the Kunstfest in Weimar, the Thüringen Bach Festival and the Thüringen Summer Organ Festival.

TFF Rudolstadt Roots Folk World Music Festival
Cuisine:
Cooking in the German state of Thüringen is molded by its wide range of fruit and vegetable production, as well as its large forest. Meals in Thüringen are very healthy, consisting often of large portions of meat with rich sauces. Wurst and wild game are among the region´s specialties.
Cakes also play an important role in Thüringen´s culinary traditions. They are found at every breakfast table, they are central to every coffee break and they are even offered to party guests as a midnight snack. However, unlike other regions in Germany, Thüringen mainly offers sheet cakes (Blechkuchen).
  
Rinderrouladen, Thüringer Klöße, Blechkuchen
Economy:
In the area between the Harz Mountains and the Thüringen Forest, agriculture has long played a very important role. In addition, major industrial centers shape the economic realm in this state.
Thüringen made a good job of getting to grips with the upheavals and structure change in the wake of the fall of the Wall. Manufacturing industry is the key sector driving growth, with a whole host of different branches represented. These include more traditional areas, such as optics, glass mining, wood/timber, metal products and the automobile industry, as well as branches, such as the plastic industry, solar energy and medical technology. The food processing industry is also developing into a significant economic factor for Thüringen.
One of the world renowned optics manufacturers, Carl Zeiss AG, has subsidies in Jena. Carl Zeiss is one of the oldest existing optics manufacturers in the world. Now over 150 years old, Zeiss continues to be associated with expensive and high-quality optical lenses. Zeiss lenses are generally thought to be elegant and well-constructed, yielding high-quality images.
Zeiss and its subsidiaries offer a wide range of products related to optics and vision. These include camera and cine lenses, microscopes and microscopy software, binoculars and spotting scopes, eyeglasses and lenses, planetariums and dome video-systems, optics for military applications (head tracker systems, submarine periscopes, targeting systems), optical sensors, industrial metrology systems and ophthalmology products.


Carl Zeiss AG. Jena 1910

  

 

Saxony and Thüringen are the strongest eastern German federal states. The regional GDP in 2008 was €49.8b. Between 1995 and 2006, the Thüringen GDP/inhabitant evolved from €14,502.6 to €19,782.1.

Tourism:

 A wide range of landscapes, a remarkable number of castles and palaces, extraordinary architectural and cultural diversity and a great range of leisure activities – that is the holiday region of Thüringen. Goethe summed up Thüringen´s merits in his inimitable style: “Where else in Germany can you find so many wonderful things in such close proximity?“
Erfurt, Weimar and other towns in Thüringen offer visitors an engaging mix of history and tradition, culture and leisure activities, the classical and the modern. In Weimar, the 1999 European City of Culture, there´s hardly anywhere that doesn´t in some way reflect the town´s rich heritage.
For many years, visitors from around the world have flocked to the statue of Goethe and Schiller in front of the German National Theater and to a total of 27 museums. The UNESCO World Heritage site ´Classical Weimar´ comprises 16 individual buildings.
But towns such as Erfurt, Jena, Eisenach, Altenberg, Meiningen and Gotha also offer plenty of cultural highlights. Erfurt is blessed with a wealth of attractions, including St. Mary´s Cathedral and the Church of St. Severus on Domplatz square, the Merchants´ Bridge and the long-established ega horticultural exhibition. Art and culture in Thüringen is closely linked to the work of representatives of Germany´s cultural and intellectual tradition. Museums, theaters, exhibitions and concert halls display the legacies of the writers Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller, the composer Johann Sebastian Bach ant the painters Lucas Cranach and Otto Dix.
Thüringen´s best known castle and the most famous landmark of the town of Eisenach is Wartburg Castle, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999. Besides Wartburg Castle, Friedenstein Palace in Gotha and the Dornburg palaces attract lots of tourists.
 
Friedenstein Palace in Gotha
 Dornburg Palace

EGV Recruiting – Interview in the making

June 4th, 2014

Today is a day for answering questions. Today we opened our doors to the news crew from DIGI 24 Romania to answer key questions healthcare recruitment. 

The interview will shed light on subjects such as:

  • current healthcare recruitment trends for doctors and nurse abroad
  • the recruiting process in depth, from applying to starting the job abroad
  • Opportunities that foreign countries have to offer to medical professionals

The interview will soon be live on the news! Stay tuned for the actual interview in a couple of days!

Thank you!