Mecklenburg-Vorpommern: A German state with a lot to offer!

July 13th, 2014

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern  is a federal state in northern Germany. The capital city is Schwerin. The state was formed through the merger of the historic regions of Mecklenburg and Vorpommern after World War II, dissolved in 1952 and recreated prior to the

German reunification in 1990. Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is the sixth largest German state by territory, and the least densely populated one. The coastline of the Baltic Sea, including islands such as Rügen and Usedom, as well as the Mecklenburg Lake District are characterized by many holiday resorts and pristine nature, making Mecklenburg-Vorpommern one of Germany’s leading tourist destinations.

   
Rügen
   
Usedom
Three of Germany’s fourteen national parks are in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, in addition to several hundred nature conservation areas.
Major cities in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern include Rostock, Schwerin, Neubrandenburg, Stralsund, Greifswald and Wismar. The University of Rostock and the University of Greifswald are among the oldest in Europe.
  
Schwerin

Culture
Over the centuries, Mecklenburg and Vorpommern have developed and maintained strong regional cultures. It can generally be described as North German and has similar linguistic and historic characteristics to other north German states, such as Schleswig-Holstein.
Architecture
The cities are characterized by a certain “Hanseatic” style also found in other parts of northern Germany as well as in countries bordering the Baltic Sea. A common feature of many towns in Mecklenburg and Vorpommern are Gothic red brick churches dating back to the middle Ages. The old towns are usually built around one or several market places with a church or town hall. Often towns were founded at the Baltic Sea, one of the many lakes or a river for logistical and trade motives.
Greifswald

Museums, art and theaters:
The largest publicly-funded theaters in the state are the Mecklenburg State Theatre, the Rostock People’s Theatre, the Theatre of West Pomerania, with venues in Greifswald, Stralsund and Putbus, and the Mecklenburg State Theatre at Neusterlitz with venues in Neubrandenburg and Neusterlitz.
Since 1993, the Störtebeker Festival has taken place in Ralswiek on the island of Rügen. It is Germany’s most successful open-air theatre.
  
Störtebeker Festival
Notable museums include, for example, the Schwerin State Museum and the Pomeranian State Museum at Greifswald. The German Maritime Museum with its Ozeaneum in Stralsund is the most popular museum in northern Germany.
 
Ozeaneum in Stralsund
Furthermore, the German Amber Museum in Ribnitz-Damagarten, Rostock’s Abbey of the Holy Cross and Rostock Art Gallery are of national importance.
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is home to many cultural events throughout the year. During summer, many open air concerts and operas are open to visitors. The Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival (Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) attracts a sizeable audience by performing classical concerts in parks, churches and castles.
  
The Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival
Caspar David Friedrich, a famous romanticist painter born in Greifswald, immortalized parts of the state in several of his paintings.
  
Caspar David Friedrich- Greifswald
Food and drinks
Like most German regions, Mecklenburg and Vorpommern have their own traditional dishes, often including fish, beef and pork. Rostock has its own type of bratwurst called Rostocker Bratwurst. An unusual food from Western Pomerania is Tollatsch. Rote Grütze is a popular dessert. The largest brewery produces Lübzer Pils.
  
Tollatsch, Rote Grütze , Lübzer Pils

Economy
In Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, approximately 732,200 people were gainfully employed in 2008 with 657,100 of them were withe and blue collar workers. About 4,200 new jobs were created in 2007. Employees worked an average of 1,455 hours a year. The number of self-employed did not change in 2008. Three out of every four of all people in work are employed in the service sector.
The biggest businesses in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern are the ferry operator Scandlines AG, the NETTO supermarket chain, the shipbuilders Aker MTW Werft, Volkswerft Stralsund GmbH and Aker Warnow Werft GmbH, the Energiewerke Nord GmbH and the shipping company F. Laeisz GmbH.

Tourism
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is among the top three destinations for inner-German tourism. The main tourist regions are:
  • Islands: Rügen and Usedom
  • Peninsula: Fischland-Darß-Zingst
  • Seaside towns: Heiligendamm, Graal-Müritz or Kühlungsborn
  • Cities: Stralsund and Wismar, both listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Rostock or Greifswald which have a large cultural heritage.
As a relic of the past, nearly 2,000 castles, palaces and manor houses exist in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, many of which function as venues for public events like concerts and festivals.
 
  
Notable people:
  • arts and film: Ernst Barlach, Friedrich von Flotow, Caspar David Friedrich, Marianne Hoppe, Till Lindemann, Philipp Otto Runge
  • business: Ernst Heinkel, Carl Heinrich von Siemens, Georg Wertheim
  • literature: Ernst Moritz Arndt, John Brinckman, Hans Fallada, Walter Kempowski, Fritz Reuter, Rudolf Tarnow, Ehm Welk
  • politics: Ernst Moritz Arndt, Dietmar Bartsch, Egon Krenz, Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, Harald Ringstorff, Angela Merkel, Joachim Gauck
  • science: Theodor Billroth, Friedrich Chrysander, Walther Flemming, Gottlob Frege, Otto Lilienthal, Gustav Mie, Ferdinand von Mueller, Paul Pogge, Heinrich Schliemann, Johannes Stark
  • sports: Tim Borowski, Andreas Dittmer, Thomas Doll, Marita Koch, Toni Kroos, Jan Ullrich, Jens Voigt, Sebastian Sylvester
If our article peaked your interest about this lovely German state, why don’t you check out our job-offers here at: www.MeJobs.eu and you’ll be one step closer to working as a doctor in Germany!

Thuringen and its offer – Or what one can do and expect when living in Thuringen!

July 6th, 2014

The free state of Thüringen is located in the central part of Germany. From the northwest going clockwise, Thüringen has borders with the states of Lower Sachsen, Sachsen-Anhalt, Sachsen, Bayern and Hessen. Thüringen is the sixth smallest by area and the fifth smallest by population of Germany´s sixteen states. Its capital city is Erfurt.


Erfurt cathedral and Severikirche


Erfurt Town Hall

Thüringen has been known by the nickname of ´´the green heart of Germany´´, from the late 19th century, due to the dense forest that covers the terrain. The ridges of the western Harz Mountains divide the region from Lower Sachsen on the north-west, while the eastern Harz similarly separates Thüringen from the state of Sachsen-Anhalt to the north-east. To the south and southwest, the Thüringen Forest effectively separates the ancient region of Franconia, now the northern part of Bavaria, from the rolling plains of most of Thüringen. The central Harz range extends southwards along the western side into the northwest corner of the Thüringen Forest region, Making Thüringen a lowland basin of rolling plains nearly surrounded by ancient somewhat-difficult mountains. To the west across the mountains and south is the drainage basin on the Rhine River.


Thüringen forest north of Schweinfurt

After the capital city of Erfurt, important urban districts are Eisenach, Gera, Jena, Suhl and Weimar.

 
Eisenach Nikolai Chuch, Luther House

 

 
Gera, view from above and Town hall

 


Jena

 


Suhl from above

 

 
Grand-Ducal Palace Weimar, Goethe Schiller monument Weimar

 Culture:

 Culture is thicker on the ground in Thüringen than in any other state in Germany. Castles, palaces, gardens and historical monasteries can be found dotting the landscape throughout the state. Thüringen boasts over 30,000 architectural and art monuments as well as 3000 archeological sites. Culture has shaped both the region´s heritage and its contemporary identity.

Belvedere Castle Weimar

Wartburg Castle
 
Bibra Castle, Ehrenburg Castle 
Classicism is at home in Thüringen. In a one-of-a-kind ensemble, the Klassik Stiftung Weimar unites museums of art and literature, the historic homes of literary luminaries and royal palaces and gardens.
This is where the legacy of Goethe and Schiller is kept alive. The spectrum covered by the collections, which have been pieced together over more than 400 years, is unequalled anywhere in the world. Among the most important institutions are the Goethe National Museum, Schiller´s Home, the Widow´s Palace, the Duchess Anna Amalia Library, the Goethe and Schiller Archive, the Nietzsche Archive and the Wieland Estate in Ossmannstedt.
 
Goethe National Museum Weimar

The Widow´s Palace

Wieland Estate in Ossmannstedt
As a land of culture, Thüringen also possesses a museum landscape that has evolved over time and continues to grow, with a number of new additions in recent years. In a total of 180 museums, art and cultural treasures of international, national and regional significance are collected, researched and exhibited. The Buchenwald and Mittelbau-Dora Memorials Foundation, by contrast, is dedicated to the task of preserving the two concentration camp sites as places of mourning and commemoration, as well as documenting and researching the historical background behind the crimes committed there.

Buchenwald concentration camp entrance
One glance at the map shows that Thüringen has more theaters and orchestras per square kilometer than any other territorial state in Germany. This cultural diversity is nurtured and maintained.
 
Theater Gera and Altenburg


Theater interior Altenburg

Thüringen has also made a name for itself over the past several years with its annual musical festivals: in summer the TFF Rudolstadt Roots Folk World Music Festival attracts crowds of music-lovers. Other cultural high points during the year are the Kulturarena in Jena, the Kunstfest in Weimar, the Thüringen Bach Festival and the Thüringen Summer Organ Festival.

TFF Rudolstadt Roots Folk World Music Festival
Cuisine:
Cooking in the German state of Thüringen is molded by its wide range of fruit and vegetable production, as well as its large forest. Meals in Thüringen are very healthy, consisting often of large portions of meat with rich sauces. Wurst and wild game are among the region´s specialties.
Cakes also play an important role in Thüringen´s culinary traditions. They are found at every breakfast table, they are central to every coffee break and they are even offered to party guests as a midnight snack. However, unlike other regions in Germany, Thüringen mainly offers sheet cakes (Blechkuchen).
  
Rinderrouladen, Thüringer Klöße, Blechkuchen
Economy:
In the area between the Harz Mountains and the Thüringen Forest, agriculture has long played a very important role. In addition, major industrial centers shape the economic realm in this state.
Thüringen made a good job of getting to grips with the upheavals and structure change in the wake of the fall of the Wall. Manufacturing industry is the key sector driving growth, with a whole host of different branches represented. These include more traditional areas, such as optics, glass mining, wood/timber, metal products and the automobile industry, as well as branches, such as the plastic industry, solar energy and medical technology. The food processing industry is also developing into a significant economic factor for Thüringen.
One of the world renowned optics manufacturers, Carl Zeiss AG, has subsidies in Jena. Carl Zeiss is one of the oldest existing optics manufacturers in the world. Now over 150 years old, Zeiss continues to be associated with expensive and high-quality optical lenses. Zeiss lenses are generally thought to be elegant and well-constructed, yielding high-quality images.
Zeiss and its subsidiaries offer a wide range of products related to optics and vision. These include camera and cine lenses, microscopes and microscopy software, binoculars and spotting scopes, eyeglasses and lenses, planetariums and dome video-systems, optics for military applications (head tracker systems, submarine periscopes, targeting systems), optical sensors, industrial metrology systems and ophthalmology products.


Carl Zeiss AG. Jena 1910

  

 

Saxony and Thüringen are the strongest eastern German federal states. The regional GDP in 2008 was €49.8b. Between 1995 and 2006, the Thüringen GDP/inhabitant evolved from €14,502.6 to €19,782.1.

Tourism:

 A wide range of landscapes, a remarkable number of castles and palaces, extraordinary architectural and cultural diversity and a great range of leisure activities – that is the holiday region of Thüringen. Goethe summed up Thüringen´s merits in his inimitable style: “Where else in Germany can you find so many wonderful things in such close proximity?“
Erfurt, Weimar and other towns in Thüringen offer visitors an engaging mix of history and tradition, culture and leisure activities, the classical and the modern. In Weimar, the 1999 European City of Culture, there´s hardly anywhere that doesn´t in some way reflect the town´s rich heritage.
For many years, visitors from around the world have flocked to the statue of Goethe and Schiller in front of the German National Theater and to a total of 27 museums. The UNESCO World Heritage site ´Classical Weimar´ comprises 16 individual buildings.
But towns such as Erfurt, Jena, Eisenach, Altenberg, Meiningen and Gotha also offer plenty of cultural highlights. Erfurt is blessed with a wealth of attractions, including St. Mary´s Cathedral and the Church of St. Severus on Domplatz square, the Merchants´ Bridge and the long-established ega horticultural exhibition. Art and culture in Thüringen is closely linked to the work of representatives of Germany´s cultural and intellectual tradition. Museums, theaters, exhibitions and concert halls display the legacies of the writers Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller, the composer Johann Sebastian Bach ant the painters Lucas Cranach and Otto Dix.
Thüringen´s best known castle and the most famous landmark of the town of Eisenach is Wartburg Castle, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999. Besides Wartburg Castle, Friedenstein Palace in Gotha and the Dornburg palaces attract lots of tourists.
 
Friedenstein Palace in Gotha
 Dornburg Palace

EGV Recruiting – Interview in the making

June 4th, 2014

Today is a day for answering questions. Today we opened our doors to the news crew from DIGI 24 Romania to answer key questions healthcare recruitment. 

The interview will shed light on subjects such as:

  • current healthcare recruitment trends for doctors and nurse abroad
  • the recruiting process in depth, from applying to starting the job abroad
  • Opportunities that foreign countries have to offer to medical professionals

The interview will soon be live on the news! Stay tuned for the actual interview in a couple of days!

Thank you!

Germany – Small Cities with a lot to offer!

May 30th, 2014

As a healthcare recruiting firm, we often come in contact with young candidates willing to relocate in Germany but mostly target large cities such as Munich, Berlin, Cologne, Stuttgart, etc. and refuse to even think about settling in a smaller city. 

Coming from eastern Europe, it is understandable that some people think that smaller towns = no opportunities and no modern commodities because in some countries this is a reality. In Germany on the other hand, smaller cities have a lot to offer and offer even more than one might expect!

If you drive through Germany and explore its cities and towns, you will experience that many cities are scattered throughout the country. There are however large German cities like Berlin, Hamburg, Munich and Cologne, as well as a lot of towns and villages.

Germany has about 82 million inhabitants. In the largest city, Berlin, live however only about 3.4 million inhabitants. In other words, the German way of life is a bit different to some other countries on earth where most people live concentrated in huge cities.

There are countries in which it seems as if humans would almost flee into the large cities. Germans dare to live comfortable and calm. There is sufficient stress during the day so it’s good to relax in the evening, in a calm environment.

Germany is remarkable for its attractive smaller towns and cities, scattered like gemstones around the country. In these historic hamlets, many of them located less than an hour’s train ride from a major metropolis, you ‘ll find a very different Germany, brimming with the flavors of the past

  • An easy daytrip from Hamburg, lovely Lübeck epitomizes the maritime culture and redbrick architecture of northern Germany. So many architectural gems are located here that the entire Old Town is a UNESCO World Heritage Site – a place judged to be of exceptional cultural value.
  • Weimar, in eastern Germany, was a cradle of the German Enlightenment of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This small unspoiled town was home to Goethe and Schiller, among others, and provides a glimpse into 18th-century German life and culture.
  • Rothenburg ob der Tauber, a major highlight among the Romantic Road, it is a walled medieval city loaded with picturesque charm. You can walk along the old city walls of this perfectly preserved gem and stroll down streets that haven’t changed much in hundreds of years.
  • A stop on the Romantic Road or an easy daytrip from Munch,Augsburg is full of historic panache and architectural surprises, including Renaissance-era palaces and the oldest almshouse in Germany.
  • Located in the Bavarian Alps near Neuschwanstein Castle, Füssen invites you to stroll along its cobblestone streets past stone houses and a rushing mountain river.
  • One of the most sophisticated spa towns in Europe, Baden-Badenoffers an extraordinary range of spa treatments during the day and elegant gaming rooms at night.
  • Heidelberg, an old university town on the Neckar River, enchants visitors with its romantic setting, historic streets, and enormous castle.
  • Quedlinburg: Spared in part from the ravages of World War II, this town in the Harz mountains still evokes the Middle Ages with its, 1600 half-timbered buildings, more than any other town in the country. Named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Quedlingburg is a gem of yesterday and was an imperial residence for 2 centuries.
  • Meissen, situated 25km north of Dresden, this is a romantic little town built along the banks of the River Elbe. It’s celebrated for its porcelain, which carries a trademark of two crossed blue swords and is valued by collectors the world over. Even without its porcelain factory, the town merits a visit for its quiet charm, its old buildings, and its 15th-century castle.
  • Dinkelsblüh, situated along the Romantic Road, it is not as grand as the more celebrated Rothenburg, it has fewer tourists and therefore retains more old-time charm.
  • Mittenwald, has long been celebrated as the most beautiful in the Bavarian Alps, with magnificently decorated houses, painted facedes and ornately carved gables. In the mid-17th century, it was known as “the Village of a Thousand Violins” because of the stringed instruments made here.
  • Lindau, dates back to the 9th century, this former free imperial town of the Holy Roman Empire is like a fantasy of what a charming Bavarian lakeside village should look like. This garden city under landmark protection is enveloped by aquamarine waters, and one part of it is known as the Gardenstadt because of its luxuriant flowers and shrubs.
  • Rüdesheim, is the most popular wine town in the Rhine Valley, being set along the edge ot he mighty river. Rüdesheim is known for its half-timbered buildings and its Drosselgasse, a narrow cobblestone lane stretching for 180m and lined with wine taverns and cozy restaurants.
  • Cochem, is an idyllic medieval riverside town situated in the wine country on the banks of the Mosel river. It is famous for its towering castle, dating from 1027. On the left bank of the Mosel, Cochem lies in a picture-postcard setting of vineyards. Little inns serving a regional cuisine along with plenty of Mosel wine make Cochem a highly desirable overnight stop and a nice alternative to the more commercial centers found along the nearby Rhine.

Adding my personal opinion to this article I have to state that the charm, history and romance of the smaller cities and towns in Germany have captured my heart and imagination.

If our article has sparked your interest you are more than welcome to apply for a job at info@MeJobs.eu

EGV Recruiting

 

France – Self-employed VS fixed salary – What foreign doctors should know

May 15th, 2014

 

As a healthcare recruiting company, here at EGV Recruiting, we have constantly dealt with medical specialists eager to obtain a well-paying job as a specialist doctor in France, but on the other hand reluctant about working as a SELF-EMPLOYED in a private practice.

We are not here to judge the priorities of certain candidates and we understand the need of stability and the fact that for many foreigners not used to the French healthcare system self-employment might not sound as stable as earning a fixed income, but in France over 51% of medical specialists are self-employed and earn a bigger gross annual income than their fixed salary counterparts.

We did not come up with this numbers, so in order to make things clear here you have the official report:

 

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has gathered a wide amount of data about OECD-countries on the topic of medical remuneration, thus shading light on the subject of income in different Western European countries.

The study is conducted only on medical specialists, defined as physicians who have specialised and work in a field other than General Practice.

The study excludes resident doctors and physicians still in training, and the study underlines the average gross annual income.

Out of the 6 countries mentioned in the survey. Germany and France have the highest number of self-employed medical specialists with their own private practice outside the hospital (41% and 51%).

Self-employed medical specialists are paid by fee of service. The service can be a Diagnosis Related Group or other procedures (ex. operations or a visit).

In some countries, there is no precise clear cut between self-employment and fixed salary. In England for example 50% of self-employed doctors also work in the hospital. In France on the other hand, self-employed doctors don’t usually work in the hospital as well but some also work a day/week in the hospital to keep in contact with their colleagues.

In France, the government does not regulate the fees that self-employed doctors charge for their services! As a self-employed medical specialist one can set his own fee of service!

So how much do doctors in France usually earn?

After crunching the numbers, medical specialists in France that work on a fixed salary basis, usually earn a average gross salary of about 131.716 Euros/year.

A self-employed medical specialist in France earns an average gross salary of about 176.042 Euros/year.

As you can see the difference is substantial. WOULD YOU LIKE TO EARN 45.000 EUROS EXTRA PER YEAR?!

If we peaked your interest about working in France as a specialist doctor, send us your resume at info@MeJobs.eu

We currently have vacant positions for specialist doctors in the field of:

-          Respiratory medicine

-          Cardiology

-          Oncology

-          Anesthesiology

-          Ophthalmology

-          Obstetrics and Gynecology

-          Urology

-          Clinical Radiology

-          Occupational Medicine

EGV Recruiting
www.MeJobs.eu

 

 

 

National premiere in Romania! Press-Fit Orthopedics intervention conducted in Targu-Mures

April 29th, 2014

In mid April 2014 Romania took a big leap forward in the field of orthopedics by performing for the first time the Press-Fit procedure in the Emergency Hospital in Targu Mures. The Press-Fit method is a biological alternative to implantation of metal screws in the bone by connecting two bone fragments with the femural tendon.

“I have not used any bioresorbable scaffold system or other fastening systems, but the fixing is done by Press-fit, so the ends of the tendon bone-tendo is fixed by special interconnection tissue, providing a joint stability and of course the patient will be able  to resume sporting activities after a period of three months, “said Prof. Tiberius Băţaga consultant in orthopedics.

The method involves bringing a femoral fragment taken from another donor patient that is stored in the  tissue  bank. The biological fixation requires a three and a half centimeter incision that is  well supported and is more aesthetic. Reconstruction has the same success as in the case of larger incisions. The press-fit system has no adjacent cost and is supported by the health system, said Prof. Băţaga.

Source of the article here

 

What does it mean to be a doctor in the field of Psychosomatic Medicine?

April 16th, 2014

 

 

Being a healthcare recruiting agency with a lot of vacant positions in the field of Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy in Germany we are often asked by our candidates:

  • “Is this specialty similar to other specialties in other countries?”
  • “What does a doctor do if he chooses to start his residency program in the field of Psychosomatic?”
  •  “Why should I be interested in following this specialty?”

The field of psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy is a relative new specialization that was established in Germany in 1992 after realising the need for such medical specialists. Currently the field is only present in Germany and Austria.

The residency program covers:

  • 3 years of psychosomatic and psychotherapy
  • 1 year of psychiatry
  • 1 year of internal medicine

Psychosomatic medicine includes:

  • Diagnosis of psychosomatic illnesses
  • Psychotherapeutic treatment
  • Prevention and rehabilitation

In order to become a specialist doctor in the field of Psychosomatic Medicine, one must complete the 5 years of residency. At least 1500 hours of psychotherapeutic treatment must be provided by the physician in training with respective minimum numbers for individual psychotherapies of different lengths (short-term therapy, shoulder length therapies, long-term therapy), group therapy, couple and family therapy.

Specialist training for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy includes:

  • ethical, scientific and legal foundations of medical practice
  • the medical evaluation
  • the measures of quality assurance and quality management, including the error and risk management
  • medical interviewing, including family counselling
  • psychosomatic Basics
  • interdisciplinary collaboration
  • the etiology, pathophysiology and pathogenesis of diseases
  • the Enlightenment and the documentation of findings
  • the laboratory-based detection methods
  • medical emergency situations
  • the principles of pharmacotherapy, including the interactions of drugs and drug abuse
  • the general pain management
  • the care of seriously ill and dying
  • interdisciplinary indications for further diagnostic tests-including the differential indication and interpretation of radiological findings related to territorial issues
  • psychosocial, environmental and cross-cultural influences on health
  • the prevention, detection, treatment and rehabilitation psychotherapeutic psychosomatic diseases and disorders including family counseling, addiction and suicide prevention
  • the practical application of scientifically recognized psychotherapy procedures and methods, especially cognitive behavioral therapy or psychodynamic psychotherapy
  • the indication for socio-therapeutic measures
  • Detection and treatment of behavioral problems in childhood and adolescence
  • Basics of detection and treatment of internal diseases that require a psychosomatic treatment
  • Detection and treatment of mental-physical interactions in chronic diseases, such as cancer, neurological, cardiac, orthopedic and rheumatic diseases as well as metabolic and autoimmune diseases
  • psychiatric history and diagnostic assessment
  • the area-based drug therapy, with particular reference to the risks of drug abuse
  • the detection and psychotherapeutic treatment of psychogenic pain syndromes
  • autogenic training or progressive muscle relaxation or hypnosis
  • the implementation of supportive and psycho-educational therapies for somatic health
  • Foundations in behavioral therapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy
  • Crisis interventions under supervision
  • 35 double hours Balint group or interaction-related casework
  • psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic consulting and liaison service

 

Why should you consider becoming a specialist doctor in the field of Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy?

Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy is an exciting and new growing medical speciality with a fast and constant evolution. It offers a new point of view regarding the correlation between physical and (somatic) illness and psychiatric factors that create somatic illnesses without physical substance.

An interesting aspect is the fact that a Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy practitioner has the opportunity to conduct psychiatric evaluations and treatments for mentally healthy individuals without having to interact with common psychiatric patients.

One can be certain that Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy practitioners will be more and more sought after in the near future!

Interested in working in the field of Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy?

Check out this job description!

 

 

 

 

Living in Abu Dhabi

March 13th, 2014

Due to the fact that we currently have new job vacancies for specialist doctors in the field of Cardiology, Gynecology, Nephrology, Anesthesiology, Pediatrics, Radiology and Emergency Medicine in the United Arab Emirates capital city Abu Dhabi, we consider useful to provide some information about living in the UAE. 

Abu Dhabi is a modern day miracle, and is considered Dubai’s less-brash sister city. Abu Dhabi now has its own skyline of architect-designed bridges and buildings, as well as a growing cluster of international museums and high-rise apartment blocks rising from the desert, making it an increasingly attractive place to live for both expats and Emirates.

What is it known for?

Abu Dhabi is a modern day miracle, and is considered Dubai’s less-brash sister city. Abu Dhabi now has its own skyline of architect-designed bridges and buildings, as well as a growing cluster of international museums and high-rise apartment blocks rising from the desert, making it an increasingly attractive place to live for both expats and Emirates.

What is it known for?

Located just 130km south from splashy Dubai, coastal Abu Dhabi has traditionally been known as the staid seat of the federal government, home to the ruling Abu Dhabi Emiri Family. The emirate owns 95% of the UAE’s oil production and 90% of the population is made up of expats. “Abu Dhabi provides a wealth of opportunity and allows people to live tax free,” said Lizzie Johnstone, a Brit who has lived with her family in Abu Dhabi for five years. “The expat and local community are welcoming, the schools are good and at the weekend you can go to the beach.”

Abu Dhabi is the largest of the UAE’s seven constituent emirates, and the city center is on Abu Dhabi island, connected to the mainland by three bridges and surrounded by a number of smaller islands, many of which are being developed by luxury resorts, shopping malls and real estate companies. Over the last decade the city has concentrated on developing its tourism, education, financial and cultural sectors to diversify its economy, which until recently relied almost exclusively on oil production. On Saadiyat Island (less than a kilometre off the shore of Abu Dhabi’s city centre), alongside luxury developments and golf courses, architect Jean Nouvel’s floating Louvre Abu Dhabi will open in December 2015, part of a cultural district that will also include the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (designed by Frank Gehry, due to open 2016) and the Zayed National Museum (designed by Foster + Partners, possibly opening 2017). A second campus for New York University Abu Dhabi is being planned for the island’s Marina district. Suburbs like the futuristic Masdar City are also part of the emirate’s master plan.

While the snazzy luxury resorts bring a bit of Dubai-like glitz, the city is also making efforts to preserve its natural resources, such as mangroves and turtle nesting spots along the turquoise waters. “If you are prepared to work hard, embrace the desert and respect the culture, you will have a very nice life,” Johnstone said.

Where do you want to live?

The Corniche on Abu Dhabi island stretches along the waterfront and is home to many mixed-use developments, hotels and malls, making it a very desirable place to live. Also sought-after are the modern luxury developments found on other islands such as Al Reem, or on the mainland in suburbs such as Khalifa City along the Abu Dhabi-Dubai Road. “People are spread out all over, but it will never take you more than half an hour ­– traffic permitting – to get anywhere,” Johnstone said.

Saadiyat Island is currently being developed with villas and high-end apartment blocks, and will be home to about 160,000 residents. Another popular island located close to the city centre, Al Reem, has experienced a few setbacks. “The master planning on Al Reem didn’t quite take off, so some of the projects have stalled,” said William Neill, director and head of Cluttons Abu Dhabi real estate and property consultant agency. Al Raha Beach, an area of Khalifa City, has a range of medium to high-end apartments, plus access to private beaches. North of the Abu Dhabi International Airport, along the E11 motorway to Dubai, the Al Reef development has villas that are popular with families.

Side trips

Dubai is about a 90-minute drive north, depending on traffic, and people go back and forth frequently; a passenger rail link between the two cities is in the planning stages, with the first expected service in 2018. Oman’s Musandam Peninsula is a popular weekend destination for diving and dolphin watching, and the northern emirate Fujairah is popular for trekking through the wadis (valleys) and hills. Muscat, the capital of Oman, is around 435km to the east, a four-hour drive or a short flight away.

Abu Dhabi International Airport has flights to many European and Asian destinations. Mumbai is about a three-hour flight, while the Maldives are just more than four hours away. Paris and London are each about a six or seven hour flight.

Practical information

Prices in Abu Dhabi used to be much higher than Dubai, so people would often live in Dubai and commute to Abu Dhabi. But post-recession, the scenario has flipped. “In addition, the government put in place a rule that if you work for a government agency or ministry, you have to live in Abu Dhabi and that helped feed demand,” Neill said. Now prices in the older buildings on Abu Dhabi Island are falling as people leave for newer communities. In modern developments and luxury buildings, there is a high demand in both rentals and sales. “Sale value tends to be going up because there is a low supply on the market,” Neill explained.

Most expats rent while living in Abu Dhabi. A two-bedroom flat in a high end building on the Corniche, Saadiyat Island or in Al Raha Beach rents for between 140,000 to 200,000 dirhams a year (it is typical for rents to be paid yearly in Abu Dhabi). On Al Reem, a similar property rents for 110,000 to 130,000 dirhams a year. In these prime areas, apartments currently cost 14,200 dirhams per square meters.

If you are interested in applying for a position in Abu Dhabi via EGV Recruiting, please contact us at:

http://www.mejobs.eu/en/contact.html

 

 

Source of the article here:

http://www.bbc.com/travel/feature/20131203-living-in-abu-dhabi/1

Denmark’s idyllic countryside

March 7th, 2014

Well-known for its cosmopolitan capital, cutting edge contemporary design and the timeless fairytales of Hans Christian Andersen, Denmark’s stunning coastlines and rolling countryside must be equally revered.

With mile upon mile of pristine coastline complemented by an unspoiled interior of forests, heaths and rolling farmland, the Danes love nothing more than getting out into the heart of their beautiful countryside. Visitors can also easily follow suit by making a leisurely exploration along one of the many designated, long-distance touring trails – ideal for exploring on foot, by bike or on an unhurried drive along picturesque country lanes.

Spoiled for choice when it comes to touring itineraries, visitors looking to travel under their own steam, for example, can walk or cycle sections of the Hærvej, or ‘Army Way’, which traces what was for centuries the main transportation route through the Jutland peninsular. Linking a whole network of paths, it forms a 250km trail along the backbone of the country, from the town of Viborg in north-central Jutland all the way south to the German border and beyond. With well-maintained walking and cycling trails established along this historic route, it follows a ridge that affords some of the most spectacular views in Denmark.

Dotted with interesting sights – including breathtaking natural scenery, historic fortifications, ancient burial mounds and plenty of Viking history – visitors can put their best foot forward discovering these at their own pace. Marking a start to the Hærvej, the imposing Viborg Cathedral, one of the largest granite churches in northern Europe whose two towers dominate the skyline, is a definite highlight. From here, the path continues south across the wild, open heaths of Kongenshus Hede and on through the outstanding natural beauty of Egtved, known for its windmills, watermills and Bronze Age relics from the grave of the Egtved Girl – which include some incredibly well-preserved burial objects dating from around 1370BC. Another unmissable historic attraction is Jelling, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that’s home to a huge, ship-shaped stone circle that was created in the 10th Century by the Viking Kings Gorm the Old and Harold Bluetooth. More recent history can be found at the Frøslev Camp Museum, a well-preserved World War II prison camp that once interred political prisoners and members of the Danish Resistance. There are also a good number of interesting detours to be made from the Hærvej, such as a visit to the sources of Denmark’s longest (the Gudenå) and its largest (Skjernå) rivers, which rise just a few hundred metres apart but then flow in opposite directions towards the east and west coasts respectively, creating their own attractions.

Runic stones in Jelling Denmark

Visitors preferring a less energetic means of travel can instead opt for one of the driving tours such as the Margueritruten, a scenic route that passes through spectacular countryside on its way past more than 200 of Denmark’s most popular attractions. Marked by characteristic marguerite (daisy) road-signs, this winding 3,600km route takes in the cities of Copenhagen, Odense and Aalborg as it wends its way through Zealand, Funen and on through central and northern Jutland, exploring some of the country’s most remote corners. Cleverly following an extremely well-planned network of roads, the trail ensures drivers never see the same view twice. Although designated as a driving route, following such quiet roads makes it equally well suited to touring by bike.

The Marguerite Route also takes full advantage of Denmark’s stunning coastline passing along the west coast and providing visitors with an opportunity to discover the Wadden Sea, one of Denmark’s most ecologically important areas. Depending on the time of year, visitors to this vast intertidal area can encounter some incredible wildlife spectacles. In the spring and autumn, the mudflats provide an important stopover site over ten million migrating shorebirds, which pause on the food-rich alluvium to refuel before continuing their epic journeys. The transitional months are also the time to witness the phenomenon of the Black Sun, when huge flocks of starlings swirl across the dusk sky with their amazing aerobatic displays presenting a truly mesmerising sight. In summer, seal safaris operate from Esbjerg Harbour, with sightings of spotted seals being virtually guaranteed. Then from October to April, guided walks across the tidal flats give visitors the chance to forage for fresh oysters, which can be harvested in large numbers all across the area.

Another interesting spot along the West Jutland coast is Ringkøbing Fjord, an area of outstanding natural beauty that’s known in particular for its watersports. Windsurfers are especially well catered for here, but there are also plenty of opportunities for other activities like canoeing, angling or simply taking a refreshing dip. Nearby Nymindegab Kro offers an interesting place to stay; this traditional Danish inn is perched high on the dunes overlooking the North Sea and is the perfect place for exploring the surrounds or tucking into delicious local dishes. Further north, the route passes through Thy National Park, allowing visitors a chance to discover nature in the raw in this extensive area of dunes, forests and heaths including the wetland reserve of Vejlerne – the largest bird sanctuary in northern Europe and home to all kinds of rare and unusual flora and fauna.

Away from the coast, other highlights along the Marguerite Route include the fairytale forest of Rold Skov. At 80 km², this is Denmark’s largest forest and home to ancient trees, crystal-clear lakes and rare wild orchids. More natural beauty can be found at Rebild Bakker, a famously picturesque area of woods, gorges and valleys,  and Mols Bjerge National Park, which occupies an area of rolling hills and wildflower-rich meadows on the Djursland peninsula. Closer to Aalborg, Denmark’s third largest city, lies Lindholm Høje, home to Scandinavia’s largest Viking burial ground with more than 700 well-preserved graves. Also of historical interest is Koldinghus Castle, Jutland’s oldest royal castle and home to an extensive art collection. Another interesting place to visit is the pretty town of Vejle, which is so well-loved by the Danes that it’s been labelled ‘Denmark’s cosiest town’. Just outside Vejle lies the recently-created Kongens Kær wetland park, complete with nature trails and picnic areas – another perfect place for visitors to pause on their journey and reflect on the pleasures of day touring, Danish-style.

Whether walking, riding or driving, Denmark’s numerous touring routes and trails offer the perfect path to a relaxing holiday.

We at EGV Recruiting currently have positions available for doctors willing to work in Denmark! Check out our offer here:

http://www.mejobs.eu/en/ofertedk.html

 

 

Source of the article here: http://www.visitdenmark.co.uk/

Weird stepstones into modern medicine

February 20th, 2014

Browsing trough the internet we stubled upon an interesting blog posting interesting and disturbing pictures of early medical devices, strange medical conduct (according to today’s standards) and things that for today’s doctors would just seem weird and creepy.

Brain hemorrhage, post-mortem

Corset damage to a ribcage. 19th century London

Dr. Kilmer’s Female Remedy

 

Tanning babies at the Chicago Orphan Asylum, 1925, to offset winter rickets

Woman with an artificial leg, too embarrassed to show her face c. 1890 – 1900

Wooden prosthetic hand, c. 1800

Selection of some items used to disguise facial injuries. Early plastic surgery.

Blood transfusion bottle, England 1978

Dr. Clark’s Spinal Apparatus advertisement, 1878

Neurological exam with electrical device, c. 1884

Antique prosthetic leg

US Civil War surgeon’s kit

“Walter Reed physiotherapy store” 1920′s

Boy in rolling “invalid cart” c. 1915

Obstetric phantom, Italy 1700-1800. Tool to teach medical students and midwives about childbirth

Radioactive yummies

Lewis Sayre’s scoliosis treatment

Claude Beck’s early defibulator

Antique birthing chair used until the 1800s

Anatomical Model. Doctors were not allowed to touch the women’s bodies, so they would point to describe pain locations

Radiology nurse technician, WWI France 1918

1855 – 1860. One of first surgical procedures using ether as an anesthetic

Masks worn by doctors during the Plague. The beaks held scented substances

 

Regardless, these pictures represent evolution. Who knows, maybe in 100 years, people looking at pictures from today’s medical conduct will react the same as we do to these pictures. What do you think?

 

Source of the article here: http://imgur.com/a/QagTz