15 Unique Illnesses You Can Only Come Down With in German!

July 16th, 2015

my-spleenThe German language is so perfectly suited for these syndromes, coming down with them in any other language just won’t do.

1. KEVINISMUS

At some point in the last couple of decades, parents in Germany started coming down withKevinismus— a strange propensity to give their kids wholly un-German, American-sounding names like Justin, Mandy, Dennis, Cindy, and Kevin. Kids with these names tend to be less successful and have more behavior problems in school. Studies of the Kevinismusphenomenon attribute these effects to a combination of teachers’ prejudices toward the names, and the lower social status of parents who choose names like Kevin.

2. FÖHNKRANKHEIT

Föhn is the name for a specific wind that cools air as it draws up one side of a mountain, and then warms it as it compresses coming down the other side. These winds are believed to cause headaches and other feelings of illness. Many a 19th century German lady took to her fainting couch with a cold compress, suffering from Föhnkrankheit.

3. KREISLAUFZUSAMMENBRUCH

Kreislaufzusammenbruch, or “circulatory collapse,” sounds deathly serious, but it’s used quite commonly in Germany to mean something like “feeling woozy” or “I don’t think I can come into work today.”

4. HÖRSTURZ

Hörsturz refers to a sudden loss of hearing, which in Germany is apparently frequently caused by stress. Strangely, while every German knows at least 5 people who have had a bout ofHörsturz, it is practically unheard of anywhere else.

5. FRÜHJAHRSMÜDIGKEIT

Frühjahrsmüdigkeit or “early year tiredness” can be translated as “spring fatigue.” Is it from the change in the weather? Changing sunlight patterns? Hormone imbalance? Allergies? As afflictions go, Frühjahrsmüdigkeit is much less fun than our “spring fever,” which is instead associated with increased vim, vigor, pep, and randiness.

6. FERNWEH

Fernweh is the opposite of homesickness. It is the longing for travel, or getting out there beyond the horizon, what you might call… awaysickness.

7. PUTZFIMMEL

Putzen means “to clean” and Fimmel is a mania or obsession. Putzfimmel is an obsession with cleaning. It is not unheard of outside of Germany, but elsewhere it is less culturally embedded and less fun to say.

8. WERTHERSFIEBER

An old-fashioned type of miserable lovesickness that was named “Werther’s fever” for the hero of Goethe’s The Sorrows of Young Werther. Poor young Werther suffers for the love of a peasant girl who is already married. Death is his only way out. A generation of sensitive young men brought made Werthersfieber quite fashionable in the late 18th century.

9. OSTALGIE

Ostalgie is nostalgia for the old way of life in East Germany (“ost” means East). If you miss your old Trabant and those weekly visits from the secret police, you may have Ostalgie.

10. ZEITKRANKHEIT

Zeitkrankheit is “time sickness” or “illness of the times.” It’s a general term for whatever the damaging mindset or preoccupations of a certain era are.

11. WELTSCHMERZ

Weltschmerz or “world pain,” is a sadness brought on by a realization that the world cannot be the way you wish it would be. It’s more emotional than pessimism, and more painful than ennui.

12. ICHSCHMERZ

Ichschmerz is like Weltschmerz, but it is dissatisfaction with the self rather than the world. Which is probably what Weltschmerz really boils down to most of the time.

13. LEBENSMÜDIGKEIT

Lebensmüdigkeit translates as despair or world-weariness, but it also more literally means “life tiredness.” When someone does something stupidly dangerous, you might sarcastically ask, “What are you doing? Are you lebensmüde?!”

14. ZIVILISATIONSKRANKHEIT

Zivilisationskrankheit, or “civilization sickness” is a problem caused by living in the modern world. Stress, obesity, eating disorders, carpal tunnel syndrome and diseases like type 2 diabetes are all examples.

15. TORSCHLUSSPANIK

Torschlusspanik or “gate closing panic” is the anxiety-inducing awareness that as time goes on, life’s opportunities just keep getting fewer and fewer and there’s no way to know which ones you should be taking before they close forever. It’s a Zivilisationskrankheit that may result in Weltschmerz, Ichschmerz, or Lebensmüdigkeit.

 

Source of the article here: http://mentalfloss.com/article/61140/15-unique-illnesses-you-can-only-come-down-german

What is psychosomatic medicine?

June 5th, 2015

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Psychosomatic medicine focuses on the interactions between mind and body and the powerful ways in which emotional, mental, social and spiritual factors can directly affect health.

Psychosomatic medicine focuses on the study and treatment of those emotional disturbances that are manifested as physical disorders. The term psychosomatic emphasizes essential unity of the psyche and the soma, a combination rooted in ancient Greek medicine. Common disorders caused at least partly by psychological factors include childhood asthma, certain gastrointestinal problems, hypertension, endocrine disturbances, diabetes, and possibly even heart disease.

Psychosomatic medicine deals with:

  • Clinical situations where mental processes act as a major factor affecting medical outcomes.
  • illnesses due to the interaction of the mind and the body
  • physical diseases which have a mental component derived from the stresses and strains of everyday living ex. lower back pain, high blood pressure
  • the influence that the mind has over physical processes
  • disabilities that are based on intellectual infirmities, rather than actual injuries or physical limitations, (somatoform disorders)
  • physical illness with their biopsychosocial aspects e.g. cancer diseases
  • physiological and functional disorders as response to psychological or physical trauma e.g. posttraumatic stress disorder and adjustment disorders
  • Conversion disorders physical symptoms , which go back to unconscious conflicts
  • Hypochondria
  • disturbed health behavior and its consequences (e.g. smoking)
  • mental disorders associated with physical discomfort: depression, anxiety disorders
  • mental illness, which have physiological effects : eating disorders, personality disorders

Psychosomatic medicine treatments are necessary in 3 different situations:

  1. The patients who have both a mental (psychiatric) illness and a medical illness, and these illnesses complicate the symptoms and management of each other
  2. The patients who have a psychiatric problem that is a direct result of a medical illness or its treatment, such as having depression due to cancer and its treatment.
  3. Somatoform disorders. Somatoform disorders are psychiatric disorders that are displayed through physical problems. In other words, the physical symptoms people experience are related to psychological factors rather than a medical cause.

Some examples:

  • Conversion disorder
  • Somatization disorder
  • Hypochondriasis
  • Body dysmorphic disorder
  • Pain disorder

Treatment types

  • psychotherapeutic conversation
  • dynamical psychotherapy
  • psychoanalyze
  • analytical group therapy
  • family therapy
  • suggestive therapy
  • hypnosis
  • body centered therapy
  • self-help groups

 

Advantages of residency training in psychosomatic medicine

Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy is an exciting and new growing medical specialty with a fast and constant evolution. It offers a new point of view regarding the correlation between physical and (somatic) illness and psychiatric factors that create somatic illnesses without physical substance. An interesting aspect is the fact that a psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy practitioner has the opportunity to conduct psychiatric evaluations and treatments for mentally healthy individuals without having to interact with common psychiatric patients.

In Germany psychosomatic primary care is compulsory part of training in all specialties. All practicing physicians need to complete an 80-hour course of basic psychosomatic care (psychosocial diagnostic interview, psychotherapeutic interventions, and relaxation techniques). The most common training method in psychosomatic medicine is based on the Balint groups method, in which a group of doctors, therapists and Psychologists consult with each other regarding the treatments of the patients and the treatment relationships.

The residency training lasts 5 years and the required rotations are the following:

  • 1 year psychiatry and psychotherapy (6 months can be spent in the department of child and adolescent psychiatry)
  • 1 year Internal medicine
  • 3 years in psychosomatics

If you start a residency in psychosomatic medicine and want to change your specialty, you can get some part of your residency training in psychosomatic medicine recognized in the following specialties:

  • Anesthesiology – 12 Months
  • Surgery – 6 Months
  • Gynecology – 6 Months (training in psychosomatics is mandatory)
  • Human genetics – 12 Months
  • Internal medicine and general medicine – 12 Months (training in psychosomatics is mandatory)
  • Pediatrics and adolescent medicine – 6 Months
  • Child and adolescent psychiatry and psychotherapy – 12 Months
  • Neurology – 12 Months
  • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
  • Psychiatry -12 Months
  • Pathology – 12 Months
  • Pharmacology – 12 Months
  • Radiology – 12 Months

Supra specialties of psychosomatic medicine are:

  • Psychoanalysis
  • Psychotherapy
  • Rehabilitations medicine
  • Acupuncture
  • Allergology
  • Occupational medicine
  • Geriatrics
  • Homeopathy

 

Top 100 sights and attractions in Germany – part 1

May 4th, 2015

Situated in the heart of Europe, Germany has plenty of fantastic tourist attractions and unique sights to offer. Visitors from all over the world travel to Germany to see architectural treasures and fascinating places of natural beauty. The German National Tourist Board (GNTB) is interested in gathering the most popular attractions and has its international visitors name their German favorites. 15,000 named their personal favorite. The 100 most mentioned were put together into Germany’s top 100 attractions.

1. Neuschwanstein Castle

292452-neuschwanstein-castle

Neuschwanstein is known all over the world as a symbol of idealised romantic architecture and for the tragic story of its owner. After losing sovereignty in his own kingdom, Ludwig II withdrew into his own world of myths, legend and fairytales.

2. Europa-Park

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If you haven’t already been to Europa-Park in Rust, then what are you waiting for! Located in south-west Germany between Freiburg and Offenburg, Europa-Park is the biggest theme park in the German-speaking countries and one of the few that is open in winter.

3. Cologne Cathedral
Cologne Cathedral (middle) and Great St. Martin Church right-hand in Cologne, Germany

There have been churches on the site of Cologne Cathedral since the 4th century. However, it was not until 1248 that this city on the Rhine became home to one of the foremost cathedrals in the Christian world – a masterpiece of Gothic architecture. When it was completed in 1880, it was the tallest building in the world.

4. Old town of Rothenburg ob der Tauber
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Rothenburg ob der Tauber is a small town with a big reputation. Nowhere else will you find such a wealth of original buildings dating from the Middle Ages. You can’t help but ask yourself whether time has stood still, as you amble past the beautiful old houses, secluded squares and tucked-away corners of the old quarter, where towers, taverns and town gates alternate with fountains, fortifications and former storehouses.

5. The Berlin Wall
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From 1961 to 1989 the Berlin Wall divided the city in two. Most of this concrete structure has since been torn down, but fragments do remain a feature of the city. The Berlin Wall Trail, a route for walkers and cyclists split into 14 sections, follows the path of the former wall. Information panels installed at 30 points tell the story of the Berlin Wall. The colourful and recently restored East Side Gallery in Friedrichshain is a piece of the hinterland wall that in 1990 was painted by artists from 21 countries. On Bernauer Strasse, where there is a replica section of the Berlin Wall, you can also visit a memorial site, a documentation centre and the Chapel of Reconciliation.

6. Heidelberg Castle/Heidelberg old quarter
schloss-heidelberg

One of Europe’s most famous landmarks, the romantic ruins of Heidelberg Castle have been attracting visitors since the 19th century.

7. Brandenburg Gate
Brandenburg Gate in Berlin

No other monument in Berlin is as famous around the world as Brandenburg Gate, built between 1789 and 1791 to plans by C. G. Langhans on Pariser Platz in the heart of the city. After the Berlin Wall was built in 1961, Brandenburg Gate became impassable for 28 years. As a signature attraction and symbol of German reunification, it now represents the past and present of the German capital in exemplary fashion. The gate is supported by six Doric columns, forming five passageways with pedestrian-only access. The famous quadriga depicting the goddess of victory, Victoria, riding a four-horse chariot was added in 1794.

8. Loreley rock in the Upper Middle Rhine Valley (UNESCO World Heritage)
Rhine_Loreley

Celebrated in song and shrouded in legend – the Loreley rock is a 194-metre-high slate cliff towering above the narrowest point of the Rhine near St. Goarshausen.

9. Lake Constance with Mainau Island, Monastic Island of Reichenau (UNESCO World Heritage), Lindau, prehistoric pile dwellings, Meersburg Castle
lake-constance---germany_674

The Lake Constance region, where Germany borders Austria and Switzerland, is a holiday paradise set around one of Europe’s largest lakes. The most popular excursion is to the Flower Island of Mainau, famous for its magnificent park and gardens surrounding the baroque family residence of Count Bernadotte. Discover an oasis of natural beauty, harmony and relaxation.

10. A beer festival for the world: Oktoberfest

Oktoberfest2_dpa

Munich is Germany’s beer capital – and the Oktoberfest is a byword for beer all over the world. When the first Oktoberfest was held back in 1810 to celebrate a royal wedding, nobody could have dreamt it would go on to become such a famous event. Since that time, the world’s biggest beer festival has been held every year in September/October on the Theresienwiese grounds, bringing smiles to people’s faces in classic Bavarian style with oompah bands, beer fresh from the barrel and plenty of good cheer. Anyone interested in the history of the festival can find out more on a guided tour of the famous Wies’n site, available since 1995 in several languages.

 

Source of the article here

Young Romanian Doctors – being sued by their hospitals

March 18th, 2015

According to the Romanian law, once a young doctors starts a residency program inside a Romanian hospital he is required by law to practice medicine inside the hospital for at least 5 years after becoming a specialist doctor.

Of course, we know that this is not always the case. Recently, hospitals have decided to take matters in their own hand in order to keep young doctors inside the public hospitals in Romania.

Some hospitals have considered being good employers and offering young doctors extra cash besides the 1000 Ron starting salary (225 Euros) and even accomodation, and some hospitals have decided to use the law, and sue if one decides to accept a position abroad or at another hospital within Romania, thus requiring the young doctor to pay back the hospital the equivalent of all salaries earned inside the hospital during the residency program.

But is it ok to “tie doctors to the land” or in this case to the hospital?!

Do you consider this action moral and ethical?!

What’s your oppinion on this subject?!

 

On the other hand, the article also comments on the fact that patients continue to “bribe” doctors and nurses. Patients in Romania consider that if they give the doctor or the nurse some extra cash, they will recieve better care and won’t be required to wait to long for a check-up.

Of course, this segment also underlines the fact that in the majority of cases doctors and nurses don’t ask for extra money from the patients. 

Patients consider that giving the doctors and nurses a “extra attention” they reward the specialists that are underpayed and keep them practicing medicine in Romanian hospital.

What’s your oppinion on this subject?

 

 

Austria’s Healthcare System

March 9th, 2015

The Austrian health policy follows the principle of ensuring equal access to high-quality care for all, irrespective of income, age and gender. The level of investment in health-care infrastructure is high by international standards. Also, compared to other OECD countries, the Austrian population enjoys above-average access to major medical-technical equipment, particularly in the area of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

Austria has an extensive network of healthcare institutions. According to Statistics, in Austria, there are 277 hospitals (123 of which were public and/or charitable hospitals) with 64,703 beds in 2012. There are also 23,562 doctors and 86,445 members of other healthcare professions practicing in Austrian hospitals. At 4.8 physicians per 1000 residents, Austria has the second highest physician-to-population ratio in the EU, after Greece. Austria trains an above EU-average number of medical students.

The Austrian health system provides universal coverage for a wide range of benefits and high-quality care. Free choice of providers and unrestricted access to all care levels (general practitioners, specialist physicians and hospitals) are characteristic features of the system. Unsurprisingly, population satisfaction is well above EU average. Income-related inequality in health has increased since 2005, although it is still relatively low compared to other countries

There are around 270 hospitals in Austria, of which 178 provide acute inpatient care. One of the stated aims of Austrian health-care planning has been to reduce the number of hospital beds. Between 2000 and 2010, the average reduction in bed numbers across Austria was 10%, though with much variation between Länder. However, compared to the rest of the EU, bed numbers per head in Austria are still amongst the highest, though approximately level with Germany

If you are interested in working as a doctor in Austria, feel free to apply for a position here: EGV Recruiting

Goodbye Headaches! Hello technology!

August 22nd, 2014

Something as simple as a common headache can ruin the daily rutine of every person no matter what.

But what would you do if you would commonly have migranes twice or three times per week? 

Think about it… How would you be able to function like a normal human being? 

For Gabriella Iaocovetti, severe headaches three or four times a week can bring her business and family life to a halt.

“No light. No noise. I try to put my head under the covers,” she says.

Like many migraine suffers, Iaocovetti also gets nauseous, which makes taking pills a problem.

“Patients will tell you, ‘Food hangs in my stomach. I’m sick to my stomach,'” says Dr. Stephen Silberstein at Jefferson University Hospital.

Even when Iaocovetti can swallow a pill, she says it takes several doses to find relief. Then, her doctor told her about an alternative now being tested. It is called the Zelrix Patch. It uses Sumatriptan, one of the most common migraine medications.

Since the drug is not normally absorbed through the skin, researchers added a tiny chip which generates a micro-current of electricity, to push it into the pores. It is about the same strength as the chips that power a musical greeting card.

Jane Hollingsworth heads up Nupath, the company that makes the chips.

“There’s a little button that you push and that starts it,” she explains. “A little red light tells you if it’s working or not, so you can see it.”

She says the patch delivers a controlled amount of medication for four hours then shuts off. She says so far, there have been no significant side effects in the clinical trials. Iaocovetti enrolled in the double blind study and while there is no way to know if she received the real patch, she believes her symptoms are already better.

The results of phase three clinical trials showed the patch was effective in treating migraines. 

 

Would you choose this alternative over a common Aspirine?

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern: A German state with a lot to offer!

July 13th, 2014

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern  is a federal state in northern Germany. The capital city is Schwerin. The state was formed through the merger of the historic regions of Mecklenburg and Vorpommern after World War II, dissolved in 1952 and recreated prior to the

German reunification in 1990. Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is the sixth largest German state by territory, and the least densely populated one. The coastline of the Baltic Sea, including islands such as Rügen and Usedom, as well as the Mecklenburg Lake District are characterized by many holiday resorts and pristine nature, making Mecklenburg-Vorpommern one of Germany’s leading tourist destinations.

   
Rügen
   
Usedom
Three of Germany’s fourteen national parks are in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, in addition to several hundred nature conservation areas.
Major cities in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern include Rostock, Schwerin, Neubrandenburg, Stralsund, Greifswald and Wismar. The University of Rostock and the University of Greifswald are among the oldest in Europe.
  
Schwerin

Culture
Over the centuries, Mecklenburg and Vorpommern have developed and maintained strong regional cultures. It can generally be described as North German and has similar linguistic and historic characteristics to other north German states, such as Schleswig-Holstein.
Architecture
The cities are characterized by a certain “Hanseatic” style also found in other parts of northern Germany as well as in countries bordering the Baltic Sea. A common feature of many towns in Mecklenburg and Vorpommern are Gothic red brick churches dating back to the middle Ages. The old towns are usually built around one or several market places with a church or town hall. Often towns were founded at the Baltic Sea, one of the many lakes or a river for logistical and trade motives.
Greifswald

Museums, art and theaters:
The largest publicly-funded theaters in the state are the Mecklenburg State Theatre, the Rostock People’s Theatre, the Theatre of West Pomerania, with venues in Greifswald, Stralsund and Putbus, and the Mecklenburg State Theatre at Neusterlitz with venues in Neubrandenburg and Neusterlitz.
Since 1993, the Störtebeker Festival has taken place in Ralswiek on the island of Rügen. It is Germany’s most successful open-air theatre.
  
Störtebeker Festival
Notable museums include, for example, the Schwerin State Museum and the Pomeranian State Museum at Greifswald. The German Maritime Museum with its Ozeaneum in Stralsund is the most popular museum in northern Germany.
 
Ozeaneum in Stralsund
Furthermore, the German Amber Museum in Ribnitz-Damagarten, Rostock’s Abbey of the Holy Cross and Rostock Art Gallery are of national importance.
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is home to many cultural events throughout the year. During summer, many open air concerts and operas are open to visitors. The Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival (Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) attracts a sizeable audience by performing classical concerts in parks, churches and castles.
  
The Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival
Caspar David Friedrich, a famous romanticist painter born in Greifswald, immortalized parts of the state in several of his paintings.
  
Caspar David Friedrich- Greifswald
Food and drinks
Like most German regions, Mecklenburg and Vorpommern have their own traditional dishes, often including fish, beef and pork. Rostock has its own type of bratwurst called Rostocker Bratwurst. An unusual food from Western Pomerania is Tollatsch. Rote Grütze is a popular dessert. The largest brewery produces Lübzer Pils.
  
Tollatsch, Rote Grütze , Lübzer Pils

Economy
In Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, approximately 732,200 people were gainfully employed in 2008 with 657,100 of them were withe and blue collar workers. About 4,200 new jobs were created in 2007. Employees worked an average of 1,455 hours a year. The number of self-employed did not change in 2008. Three out of every four of all people in work are employed in the service sector.
The biggest businesses in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern are the ferry operator Scandlines AG, the NETTO supermarket chain, the shipbuilders Aker MTW Werft, Volkswerft Stralsund GmbH and Aker Warnow Werft GmbH, the Energiewerke Nord GmbH and the shipping company F. Laeisz GmbH.

Tourism
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is among the top three destinations for inner-German tourism. The main tourist regions are:
  • Islands: Rügen and Usedom
  • Peninsula: Fischland-Darß-Zingst
  • Seaside towns: Heiligendamm, Graal-Müritz or Kühlungsborn
  • Cities: Stralsund and Wismar, both listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Rostock or Greifswald which have a large cultural heritage.
As a relic of the past, nearly 2,000 castles, palaces and manor houses exist in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, many of which function as venues for public events like concerts and festivals.
 
  
Notable people:
  • arts and film: Ernst Barlach, Friedrich von Flotow, Caspar David Friedrich, Marianne Hoppe, Till Lindemann, Philipp Otto Runge
  • business: Ernst Heinkel, Carl Heinrich von Siemens, Georg Wertheim
  • literature: Ernst Moritz Arndt, John Brinckman, Hans Fallada, Walter Kempowski, Fritz Reuter, Rudolf Tarnow, Ehm Welk
  • politics: Ernst Moritz Arndt, Dietmar Bartsch, Egon Krenz, Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, Harald Ringstorff, Angela Merkel, Joachim Gauck
  • science: Theodor Billroth, Friedrich Chrysander, Walther Flemming, Gottlob Frege, Otto Lilienthal, Gustav Mie, Ferdinand von Mueller, Paul Pogge, Heinrich Schliemann, Johannes Stark
  • sports: Tim Borowski, Andreas Dittmer, Thomas Doll, Marita Koch, Toni Kroos, Jan Ullrich, Jens Voigt, Sebastian Sylvester
If our article peaked your interest about this lovely German state, why don’t you check out our job-offers here at: www.MeJobs.eu and you’ll be one step closer to working as a doctor in Germany!

Thuringen and its offer – Or what one can do and expect when living in Thuringen!

July 6th, 2014

The free state of Thüringen is located in the central part of Germany. From the northwest going clockwise, Thüringen has borders with the states of Lower Sachsen, Sachsen-Anhalt, Sachsen, Bayern and Hessen. Thüringen is the sixth smallest by area and the fifth smallest by population of Germany´s sixteen states. Its capital city is Erfurt.


Erfurt cathedral and Severikirche


Erfurt Town Hall

Thüringen has been known by the nickname of ´´the green heart of Germany´´, from the late 19th century, due to the dense forest that covers the terrain. The ridges of the western Harz Mountains divide the region from Lower Sachsen on the north-west, while the eastern Harz similarly separates Thüringen from the state of Sachsen-Anhalt to the north-east. To the south and southwest, the Thüringen Forest effectively separates the ancient region of Franconia, now the northern part of Bavaria, from the rolling plains of most of Thüringen. The central Harz range extends southwards along the western side into the northwest corner of the Thüringen Forest region, Making Thüringen a lowland basin of rolling plains nearly surrounded by ancient somewhat-difficult mountains. To the west across the mountains and south is the drainage basin on the Rhine River.


Thüringen forest north of Schweinfurt

After the capital city of Erfurt, important urban districts are Eisenach, Gera, Jena, Suhl and Weimar.

 
Eisenach Nikolai Chuch, Luther House

 

 
Gera, view from above and Town hall

 


Jena

 


Suhl from above

 

 
Grand-Ducal Palace Weimar, Goethe Schiller monument Weimar

 Culture:

 Culture is thicker on the ground in Thüringen than in any other state in Germany. Castles, palaces, gardens and historical monasteries can be found dotting the landscape throughout the state. Thüringen boasts over 30,000 architectural and art monuments as well as 3000 archeological sites. Culture has shaped both the region´s heritage and its contemporary identity.

Belvedere Castle Weimar

Wartburg Castle
 
Bibra Castle, Ehrenburg Castle 
Classicism is at home in Thüringen. In a one-of-a-kind ensemble, the Klassik Stiftung Weimar unites museums of art and literature, the historic homes of literary luminaries and royal palaces and gardens.
This is where the legacy of Goethe and Schiller is kept alive. The spectrum covered by the collections, which have been pieced together over more than 400 years, is unequalled anywhere in the world. Among the most important institutions are the Goethe National Museum, Schiller´s Home, the Widow´s Palace, the Duchess Anna Amalia Library, the Goethe and Schiller Archive, the Nietzsche Archive and the Wieland Estate in Ossmannstedt.
 
Goethe National Museum Weimar

The Widow´s Palace

Wieland Estate in Ossmannstedt
As a land of culture, Thüringen also possesses a museum landscape that has evolved over time and continues to grow, with a number of new additions in recent years. In a total of 180 museums, art and cultural treasures of international, national and regional significance are collected, researched and exhibited. The Buchenwald and Mittelbau-Dora Memorials Foundation, by contrast, is dedicated to the task of preserving the two concentration camp sites as places of mourning and commemoration, as well as documenting and researching the historical background behind the crimes committed there.

Buchenwald concentration camp entrance
One glance at the map shows that Thüringen has more theaters and orchestras per square kilometer than any other territorial state in Germany. This cultural diversity is nurtured and maintained.
 
Theater Gera and Altenburg


Theater interior Altenburg

Thüringen has also made a name for itself over the past several years with its annual musical festivals: in summer the TFF Rudolstadt Roots Folk World Music Festival attracts crowds of music-lovers. Other cultural high points during the year are the Kulturarena in Jena, the Kunstfest in Weimar, the Thüringen Bach Festival and the Thüringen Summer Organ Festival.

TFF Rudolstadt Roots Folk World Music Festival
Cuisine:
Cooking in the German state of Thüringen is molded by its wide range of fruit and vegetable production, as well as its large forest. Meals in Thüringen are very healthy, consisting often of large portions of meat with rich sauces. Wurst and wild game are among the region´s specialties.
Cakes also play an important role in Thüringen´s culinary traditions. They are found at every breakfast table, they are central to every coffee break and they are even offered to party guests as a midnight snack. However, unlike other regions in Germany, Thüringen mainly offers sheet cakes (Blechkuchen).
  
Rinderrouladen, Thüringer Klöße, Blechkuchen
Economy:
In the area between the Harz Mountains and the Thüringen Forest, agriculture has long played a very important role. In addition, major industrial centers shape the economic realm in this state.
Thüringen made a good job of getting to grips with the upheavals and structure change in the wake of the fall of the Wall. Manufacturing industry is the key sector driving growth, with a whole host of different branches represented. These include more traditional areas, such as optics, glass mining, wood/timber, metal products and the automobile industry, as well as branches, such as the plastic industry, solar energy and medical technology. The food processing industry is also developing into a significant economic factor for Thüringen.
One of the world renowned optics manufacturers, Carl Zeiss AG, has subsidies in Jena. Carl Zeiss is one of the oldest existing optics manufacturers in the world. Now over 150 years old, Zeiss continues to be associated with expensive and high-quality optical lenses. Zeiss lenses are generally thought to be elegant and well-constructed, yielding high-quality images.
Zeiss and its subsidiaries offer a wide range of products related to optics and vision. These include camera and cine lenses, microscopes and microscopy software, binoculars and spotting scopes, eyeglasses and lenses, planetariums and dome video-systems, optics for military applications (head tracker systems, submarine periscopes, targeting systems), optical sensors, industrial metrology systems and ophthalmology products.


Carl Zeiss AG. Jena 1910

  

 

Saxony and Thüringen are the strongest eastern German federal states. The regional GDP in 2008 was €49.8b. Between 1995 and 2006, the Thüringen GDP/inhabitant evolved from €14,502.6 to €19,782.1.

Tourism:

 A wide range of landscapes, a remarkable number of castles and palaces, extraordinary architectural and cultural diversity and a great range of leisure activities – that is the holiday region of Thüringen. Goethe summed up Thüringen´s merits in his inimitable style: “Where else in Germany can you find so many wonderful things in such close proximity?“
Erfurt, Weimar and other towns in Thüringen offer visitors an engaging mix of history and tradition, culture and leisure activities, the classical and the modern. In Weimar, the 1999 European City of Culture, there´s hardly anywhere that doesn´t in some way reflect the town´s rich heritage.
For many years, visitors from around the world have flocked to the statue of Goethe and Schiller in front of the German National Theater and to a total of 27 museums. The UNESCO World Heritage site ´Classical Weimar´ comprises 16 individual buildings.
But towns such as Erfurt, Jena, Eisenach, Altenberg, Meiningen and Gotha also offer plenty of cultural highlights. Erfurt is blessed with a wealth of attractions, including St. Mary´s Cathedral and the Church of St. Severus on Domplatz square, the Merchants´ Bridge and the long-established ega horticultural exhibition. Art and culture in Thüringen is closely linked to the work of representatives of Germany´s cultural and intellectual tradition. Museums, theaters, exhibitions and concert halls display the legacies of the writers Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller, the composer Johann Sebastian Bach ant the painters Lucas Cranach and Otto Dix.
Thüringen´s best known castle and the most famous landmark of the town of Eisenach is Wartburg Castle, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999. Besides Wartburg Castle, Friedenstein Palace in Gotha and the Dornburg palaces attract lots of tourists.
 
Friedenstein Palace in Gotha
 Dornburg Palace

EGV Recruiting – Interview in the making

June 4th, 2014

Today is a day for answering questions. Today we opened our doors to the news crew from DIGI 24 Romania to answer key questions healthcare recruitment. 

The interview will shed light on subjects such as:

  • current healthcare recruitment trends for doctors and nurse abroad
  • the recruiting process in depth, from applying to starting the job abroad
  • Opportunities that foreign countries have to offer to medical professionals

The interview will soon be live on the news! Stay tuned for the actual interview in a couple of days!

Thank you!

Germany – Small Cities with a lot to offer!

May 30th, 2014

As a healthcare recruiting firm, we often come in contact with young candidates willing to relocate in Germany but mostly target large cities such as Munich, Berlin, Cologne, Stuttgart, etc. and refuse to even think about settling in a smaller city. 

Coming from eastern Europe, it is understandable that some people think that smaller towns = no opportunities and no modern commodities because in some countries this is a reality. In Germany on the other hand, smaller cities have a lot to offer and offer even more than one might expect!

If you drive through Germany and explore its cities and towns, you will experience that many cities are scattered throughout the country. There are however large German cities like Berlin, Hamburg, Munich and Cologne, as well as a lot of towns and villages.

Germany has about 82 million inhabitants. In the largest city, Berlin, live however only about 3.4 million inhabitants. In other words, the German way of life is a bit different to some other countries on earth where most people live concentrated in huge cities.

There are countries in which it seems as if humans would almost flee into the large cities. Germans dare to live comfortable and calm. There is sufficient stress during the day so it’s good to relax in the evening, in a calm environment.

Germany is remarkable for its attractive smaller towns and cities, scattered like gemstones around the country. In these historic hamlets, many of them located less than an hour’s train ride from a major metropolis, you ‘ll find a very different Germany, brimming with the flavors of the past

  • An easy daytrip from Hamburg, lovely Lübeck epitomizes the maritime culture and redbrick architecture of northern Germany. So many architectural gems are located here that the entire Old Town is a UNESCO World Heritage Site – a place judged to be of exceptional cultural value.
  • Weimar, in eastern Germany, was a cradle of the German Enlightenment of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This small unspoiled town was home to Goethe and Schiller, among others, and provides a glimpse into 18th-century German life and culture.
  • Rothenburg ob der Tauber, a major highlight among the Romantic Road, it is a walled medieval city loaded with picturesque charm. You can walk along the old city walls of this perfectly preserved gem and stroll down streets that haven’t changed much in hundreds of years.
  • A stop on the Romantic Road or an easy daytrip from Munch,Augsburg is full of historic panache and architectural surprises, including Renaissance-era palaces and the oldest almshouse in Germany.
  • Located in the Bavarian Alps near Neuschwanstein Castle, Füssen invites you to stroll along its cobblestone streets past stone houses and a rushing mountain river.
  • One of the most sophisticated spa towns in Europe, Baden-Badenoffers an extraordinary range of spa treatments during the day and elegant gaming rooms at night.
  • Heidelberg, an old university town on the Neckar River, enchants visitors with its romantic setting, historic streets, and enormous castle.
  • Quedlinburg: Spared in part from the ravages of World War II, this town in the Harz mountains still evokes the Middle Ages with its, 1600 half-timbered buildings, more than any other town in the country. Named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Quedlingburg is a gem of yesterday and was an imperial residence for 2 centuries.
  • Meissen, situated 25km north of Dresden, this is a romantic little town built along the banks of the River Elbe. It’s celebrated for its porcelain, which carries a trademark of two crossed blue swords and is valued by collectors the world over. Even without its porcelain factory, the town merits a visit for its quiet charm, its old buildings, and its 15th-century castle.
  • Dinkelsblüh, situated along the Romantic Road, it is not as grand as the more celebrated Rothenburg, it has fewer tourists and therefore retains more old-time charm.
  • Mittenwald, has long been celebrated as the most beautiful in the Bavarian Alps, with magnificently decorated houses, painted facedes and ornately carved gables. In the mid-17th century, it was known as “the Village of a Thousand Violins” because of the stringed instruments made here.
  • Lindau, dates back to the 9th century, this former free imperial town of the Holy Roman Empire is like a fantasy of what a charming Bavarian lakeside village should look like. This garden city under landmark protection is enveloped by aquamarine waters, and one part of it is known as the Gardenstadt because of its luxuriant flowers and shrubs.
  • Rüdesheim, is the most popular wine town in the Rhine Valley, being set along the edge ot he mighty river. Rüdesheim is known for its half-timbered buildings and its Drosselgasse, a narrow cobblestone lane stretching for 180m and lined with wine taverns and cozy restaurants.
  • Cochem, is an idyllic medieval riverside town situated in the wine country on the banks of the Mosel river. It is famous for its towering castle, dating from 1027. On the left bank of the Mosel, Cochem lies in a picture-postcard setting of vineyards. Little inns serving a regional cuisine along with plenty of Mosel wine make Cochem a highly desirable overnight stop and a nice alternative to the more commercial centers found along the nearby Rhine.

Adding my personal opinion to this article I have to state that the charm, history and romance of the smaller cities and towns in Germany have captured my heart and imagination.

If our article has sparked your interest you are more than welcome to apply for a job at info@MeJobs.eu

EGV Recruiting